Personal Perspective

“As we visit homes in the village and meet with children with cerebral palsy and their parents, the memory of this boy in pain gives me energy and impetus to keep going, to keep teaching and showing and training as much as I am able, so that other kids can have a chance to be well cared for and helped,” says Beth.

Our experience with this boy encourages us to keep smiling, to keep telling people that besides what the culture tells them – they are loved by God, not cursed, and their love is seen by their children.”
“During our leisurely stroll, we came across a pigpen,” remembers Inger. “No more finely kept grass; it ended where the enclosure began. Beyond the fence, the inhabitants had trampled the turf into deep, moist mud. I commented on the squelchy state of their pen. To my surprise—and slight dismay—my father reached over the fence and started to scratch one of the pigs behind its ears…We watched. The pig appeared to like it.”
“I joined a homegroup (Bible Study or life group) two years ago and as time passes, more and more of each member’s character is coming forward,” says Renette. “It dawned on me the other day that we honestly do not have anything in common. No one does the same job or has the same friends or enjoys the same hobbies. No one would have met if it wasn’t for the homegroup. The only thing in common is our love for Jesus.”
“It was five years ago that I ran through the flag tunnel in South Korea and entered the Logos Hope ship for the first time,” remembers Camila. “My heart was beating fast and my mouth was dry. I carried a suitcase full of clothes and pictures of the people I would miss. I also carried with me many dreams and things I wanted to achieve in those first two years—professional dreams, sentimental dreams, material dreams—all of which came from the desires of my heart.”
“Listening to their testimonies, I’ve begun to envision their stories as a collection of clues, a series of scenes revealing the fingerprints of something—or Someone—beyond our deepest imagination,” says Chris. “The people I talked with hail from a variety of backgrounds—atheist German to Cambodian Buddhist—but the tapestries of their lives reveal the same beautiful threads, pointing unmistakably to a Designer.“
“Since my childhood, I have been anxious about missing out. I remember not wanting to sleep whenever I heard the adults chatting in the night. I wanted to be part of it all. Later on, in high school, I said “yes” to every event and outing, which ended up crashing so many times. I couldn’t choose. I wanted to be there to celebrate all the fun moments but also share all the tears in the low moments,” says Ivy.

“However, this lifestyle of being afraid of missing out could not continue when I joined missions. I have had to learn how to let go when I miss out on opportunities to create precious memories with family and friends in my home country.”
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